Posts Tagged ‘ abortion ’

the real lessons from the 2012 election

Al Mohler, whom I greatly respect, posted some lessons from the 2012 election that he learned. His basic conclusion is that America is becoming more liberal, less moral, and more anti-Christian, and that the Republican Party and Christians need to consider a way to “winsomely convince Americans to share our moral convictions.”

Really?

I understand that during elections we can sometimes see trends and patterns that aren’t as objectively visible during non-election season, but this election told me very little about non-Christian America. I already knew the unbelieving world was morally bankrupt, anti-Christian, hostile to the gospel, against traditional marriage, consumed with self-interest, etc. Read Paul’s Spirit-inspired description of the non-believing world back in his day: “People will be lovers of self, lovers of money, proud, arrogant, abusive, disobedient to their parents, ungrateful, unholy, heartless, unappeasable, slanderous, without self-control, brutal, not loving good, treacherous, reckless, swollen with conceit, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God, having the appearance of godliness, but denying its power” (2 Tim 3:2-5).

Paul wrote those words 2,000 years ago. America didn’t become like this suddenly the past 4 years. This is the way unbelievers have been for millennia. Maybe the religious heritage of our nation prevented these sins from being especially visible, but that doesn’t mean that they weren’t there, hidden beneath the surface of religious or social pretense.

Are we worse off spiritually as a nation now than we were 15 or 20 years ago? Perhaps, but that’s not because unbelieving society is becoming more liberal or morally bankrupt. It’s because Christians haven’t spread the gospel or showed the love of Christ to unbelievers, and now we find ourselves as a shrinking minority. Or to say it another way, there are less Christians in America than there used to be and so America is literally becoming un-Christian. What do you think happens when the salt of the earth loses its flavor or the light of the world is put under a basket? We’re seeing it before our very eyes.

The only way for Christians to “winsomely convince Americans to share our moral convictions” is by helping said Americans to see their need for Christ and come to Him for salvation. Then the Holy Spirit will do the work of showing them where their moral convictions need to be. We can’t make America Christian from the outside in. The Spirit’s work of sanctification (i.e., “setting apart”) can only be done from the inside out. We must start with the hearts of individual people in order to reach the moral backbone of our nation. But we already knew all that, right?

That’s why I said that this election told me very little about non-Christian America. It did, however, tell me a great deal about Christians and the American Church. Let’s look at some of the lessons I learned about Christianity from this election.

I learned that Christians associate their missional identity far too closely with their political one. For the Christian, there is only one agenda on this earth – to glorify God by helping people (including ourselves) become disciples of Christ. That’s it. Our agenda isn’t to moralize society. It’s not to make America conservative. It’s not even to attack sinful patterns that we see in society. Discipleship is first, last, and only on the list of things Christians should be accomplishing.

Now here’s the irony of what we’re seeing the Church today – the emphasis on social politics as a (or the)  mission of the Church has actually done the exact opposite of our true mission. The “Moral Majority” mindset hasn’t led our nation to desire to follow Christ – it’s turned people away from Christ! And even if we were successful at making our nation more moral, that still hasn’t made them more Christian. God isn’t glorified by a bunch of sinners who try not to sin. He’s glorified by sinners who recognize their sinfulness and turn to Him for rescue from it. There is very little that we can do to distract from that more than focusing our efforts on social issues in our society.

But there is another issue here – that Christians are measuring their success by what happens at the polls. The mood yesterday among many Christians was one of doom and gloom. We failed. The total secularization of America is coming. Christians are about to be eradicated. The end is near.

God doesn’t measure our success by whomever is elected into our government. If so, then Jesus’ whole concept of  “the Church” has been an utter failure. When has there ever been a time that the Church has found a way to bring perfect people into the leadership of a country? And while we’re at it, when in the OT theocracy did God ever set up a perfect person to lead Israel? Or how about the Israelite Monarchy? I’m pretty sure that King Saul for most of his reign was a more godless man than Barack Obama has ever been. Do you know who “elected” him? Yahweh.

God is doing something much bigger here that cannot be measured by how godly or godless our government officials are. His assessment is based on His people’s heart and, in particular, on whether or not they love Him with everything they are and whether or not they love their neighbors as themselves. And sometimes believers do love as God desires them to and strive for discipleship, and yet their efforts have no discernible effect on their surroundings (See: Jeremiah, Book of). That doesn’t mean that they have failed in their mission. It just means that God has chosen to bless them in a way that remains to be seen.

I learned that Christians identify too closely with the Republican Party. I already knew this to be the case, but boy do I know it now. Christians were willing to compromise a tremendous amount of their faith in order to try to get Mitt Romney into office.

How do I know this to be the case? Because the vast majority of Al Mohler’s article could have been written by an unsaved Republican politician, and it wouldn’t have seriously altered its message. Because Billy Graham met with Mitt Romney before the election and immediately took his website’s statement against Mormonism off of the internet so that it wouldn’t hinder the Republican cause. Because Christians are willing to rally against liberals to “support life”, but then in the same breath support the ruthless and unconstitutional killing of leaders, civilizations, and fellow Christians abroad. Why? Because that’s what Republicans do, and Christians are Republicans; so it’s what we do too.

Listen, when the world associates Christians with the Republican Party, it’s not a good thing. It’s not a good thing to be associated with any party, because they all have major flaws that dishonor God. Christ wasn’t a Republican, and if a Christian has good reasons to be a Democrat, Libertarian, Green Party member, or what have you, they are free to, but they should all hold their political party loosely, so as to not bring their party’s baggage onto the name of Christ.

I learned that Christians looked to the Republican candidate as a sort of savior of our nation who, after losing the election, also lost our nation along with him. There was literal weeping, wailing, and gnashing of teeth that I saw and heard from the evangelical community. Why? I’m not even sure that those who were so upset knew. I know that some were concerned about Obama’s economic and foreign policies, but I think the majority are scared to death about what his social policy could entail the next 4 years.

Four more years of a liberal President!? The world may end during that time! At least 2 more liberal Supreme Court Justices! Permanent abortion! Gay marriage federally legalized! Contraceptives required to be funded by churches! The 10 Commandments kicked out of schools! Christian liberties abolished!

Let’s be honest with ourselves here – Obama probably will not be able to do everything evangelicals fear he will (even if he wants to). But even if he does, we can be certain that Romney would not have been able to undo it all. How would he undo the laws on abortion? It’s not as simple as just appointing a couple of conservative justices and having them overturn Roe v Wade. Not to mention, Romney flip-flopped on the issue of abortion anyway, and we don’t even know what he truly believes on it. What about Obamacare (which is the cause of the contraceptives dispute that the Catholic Church has with the government)? Romney already said he liked parts of Obamacare and that he wouldn’t get rid of them. But the parts he wanted to keep would have not have been possible without keeping the most controversial parts of the bill. Plus Romney passed Romneycare in Massachusetts, which is basically Obamacare on the state level.

But the bigger picture here is that Christians have only one Savior – Jesus. What if our country becomes totalitarian and starts persecuting Christians? For us, nothing significant has changed. Our hope lies in Jesus, both for our spiritual needs and for our physical ones. We should still vote and be passionate about improving our country, but if “our guy” doesn’t get elected we have to shrug our shoulders and move on. Our citizenship is in heaven, and ultimately our Supreme King determines who rules us during our time on earth.

I learned that Christians did not focus on God the way they should have leading up to the elections. Social media among Christians exploded yesterday with a host of theological cliches aimed at making them feel better about their defeat – “God is still in control,” “This world is not my home,” “God’s wrath is coming on this country,” etc. Now I’m aware that some people posted these things to console others about the election outcome, but a great deal of what I saw was Christians clearly consoling themselves.

Before I go any further, I need to clarify that if we console ourselves or others when discouraged, it should be in truth about God, specifically the truth of the gospel. But something about what I kept seeing after this election made it feel disingenuous. Specifically, I noticed a lot of people who acted like they could care less about God’s sovereignty leading up to the election, who suddenly became bold preachers of God’s sovereignty after Obama won. Were they directing their thoughts that way prior to the election? And if so, why did they only start talking about it after the election was lost?

My hunch, and I admit that this is a guess on my part, is that many Christians were not thinking much about God in the days leading up to the election. Their thoughts going into the election wasn’t, “This world isn’t my eternal dwelling place. Ultimately, these elections will have no bearing on my soul. But God is in control, and even if I don’t like who our president is, God will sustain and protect me in the way He sees fit.”

The great chagrin that Christians demonstrated once Obama was reelected suggests to me that their pre-election thought process went more like this: “If we can just get Romney into the White House, he’ll be able to turn around this mess that Obama got us into.” Once Obama was reelected and hope of that turn-around was out of the question, suddenly God enters the picture. So they console themselves with thoughts that “God is in control,” which is really just a way of saying, “I have no clue what God is doing right now, but I sure hope He does.”

Maybe I’m being a bit judgmental here, but how else can you describe the evangelical response to the election? If you were meditating on God’s sovereignty and on the eternal state prior to the elections, how could you possibly be outraged, depressed, or anxious following the election results? I could understand feeling a bit of frustration with the direction our country is heading in, but in general those emotional responses aren’t fruit of the Spirit, and they don’t come from God. Neither did the bulk of the response that came out of evangelicalism following the election.

I learned that Christians have a very elementary understanding of government and how it relates to their faith. This needs to be broken down into subpoints.

1. Confusion on how large the government should be

Liberal America wants the federal government to pass gay marriage. Conservative America wants the federal government to ban gay marriage. Liberal America wants the federal government to maintain abortion. Conservative America wants the federal government to ban abortion. Liberal America wants the federal government to put up a wall of separation between religion and state. Conservative America wants the federal government to allow a blending of religion and state (but only if that means the state doesn’t interfere with religion and that it only allows Christian things to be involved in the government, not other religious elements).

What’s the similarity between all of these illustrations of the stark difference between liberal and conservative politics? They all rely on the federal government to control social issues as they’d like. But there’s a problem here – America is a huge nation. We have literally hundreds of governments in states, counties, and cities that operate under our federal government. If the federal government messes up, we all suffer for it. And, guess what? The federal government messes up a lot.

The reason why Christians have lost the war over abortion is because the federal government got involved. Yet they want to use the federal government to outlaw abortion. How foolish is that? We’re going to give one government that wields its power over 300,000,000+ people the ability with one stroke of the pen to determine who lives and who doesn’t? And do you really want the federal government to determine who can get married and who can’t? Do you realize how great of a risk you’re taking giving that kind of power to our central government?

Christians will continue to lose political victories if they keep giving the federal government power over social issues. Why? Because all it takes is a handful of men in the federal government to change everything. The best answer is to limit federal power and give more authority to the states. Then Christians can have more influence in legislation that affects them and elect someone closer to their worldview. But even then, it will never be perfect. As I stated before, the ultimate solution to our country’s problems is the gospel, not the government.

2. Confusion on whether our government should be a theocracy or not

Most Christians would say they aren’t trying to make America into a theocracy. But practically speaking, this often doesn’t appear to be the case.

Let’s talk about gay marriage again. Why do Christians want to outlaw gay marriage? The quick answer is, “Because it’s a sin!” But if you actually read what the Bible says about marriage, you’ll find that it never addresses gay marriage at all. What it does address is homosexuality, but that’s not what we’re talking about here. Even if gay marriage were banned, homosexuality, which is the real sin issue, would still continue in America. So should Christians lobby for banning homosexuality? What about premarital sex? Divorce? Covetousness? Deceit?

Pretty soon you go down the slippery slope and find yourself creating a government based on the rules of the Bible. You might even call it a theocracy. But that’s a good thing, right?

Wrong. For starters, the Bible is not a government handbook. But more importantly, people should have the right to choose to sin or to turn away from their sin to Christ. God gave us free will for a reason, and it’s not the government’s job to decide our morality for us. The government’s primary responsibility is to protect and sustain its citizens. There are some sins that inhibit a person’s protection or sustenance and those should be outlawed, but it’s outside the bounds of a government’s responsibility to tell people that they can’t sin. That’s God’s job, not the government.

3. Confusion on what significance Christian symbols really have

Most Christians feel threatened by the government when it does things like outlawing the Ten Commandments from being in schools and courthouses, outlawing public prayer in government buildings, eliminating crosses from public parks, etc. Now I’m not saying that we shouldn’t try to fight for religious freedom, but our fight should be done properly and intelligently, not angrily and defensively. And our fight for freedom should come second to our expression of our freedom – namely our efforts to make people into disciples of Christ.

Furthermore, much of the fight over “freedom” is more of a fight over the symbols of Christianity than it is over real freedom. I could go on with this point, but it has already been articulated quite well.

I learned that Christians want religious entitlements. “Liberals” allegedly want social entitlements from the government; so Christians expect the government to provide what I’m going to call “religious entitlements,” and ultimately this is exactly what the Republican Party has promised to evangelicals in order to get their vote.

What do I mean by “religious entitlements?” I mean that we think that we shouldn’t have to make difficult decisions between obeying God and obeying the the government. We think that people should be forced to have the same worldview as us. We think that we should be able to be hateful toward those who disagree with us, without consequences. We think that we should be able to hold to our Christian beliefs while still pursuing the American Dream. We think that the government should give precedence to Christianity over other religions. We think that we have the right to be Christian and have it easy.

The majority of our brothers and sisters in Christ who live overseas would have no idea what we’re talking about. Nor would they desire to.

I’m not saying that religious freedom is bad. I’m just saying that we aren’t entitled to it and we shouldn’t tell the world that we are. That turns them off to Christ all the more, just like it turns us off when we see people mooching off the government for entitlements that we don’t think they deserve. We should be grateful when given religious freedoms, respectful when they’re taken away, and resolute when the absence of religious freedom forces us to practice civil disobedience.

Do you know what happened when the Christians of the Early Church had their “religious entitlements” taken away? They rejoiced. They didn’t cry about it. They didn’t talk about God bringing judgment on their country. They didn’t run away, scared. They thanked God for being able to share, in a small way, in the sufferings of Christ and of the believers who went before them.

The Republican Party appears, in a lot of ways, to be a dying breed. Either Christians can go down with the Republican ship, fighting for air after every wave of opposition comes crashing down, or they can cut the cord once and for all and be followers of Christ, as our true King commands them to us. Christians haven’t had any problem following God in a country full of religious liberties. The question is, whether that commitment to God will remain when the social conservatism that the Republican Party has kept alive ceases to exist.

Christianity and Homosexuality Part 1: A Political Perspective

There is a sad reality that we face as Christians – our rallying point is no longer the gospel; it’s politics. What I mean is the most surefire way to have Christians from different denominations, races, agendas, subcultures, worship styles, and general theological presuppositions get together and be unified is to have them rally together over “family” (i.e., against homosexuality) or “life” (i.e., against abortion). Politics.

I’ve heard tons of examples of “great success” that churches have had coming together with other churches (with whom they could never find fellowship in the gospel) for a political rally. Such was the case with a former church I attended in Greenville, which bragged about how they had rallied several years ago with other Christians and churches, with whom they had serious theological disagreements, because they were able to set their gospel differences aside for the cause of politics. This type of thinking is simple – we can’t spread the gospel with these other believers because we have too many significant theological differences that would cause more disruption than unity. On the other hand, finding unity in politics is much more simple because you either believe in abortion or you don’t. There aren’t as many potential issues that two Christians could disagree on within the discussion on abortion as there are when it comes to the theologies of salvation and sanctification.

Now, I understand this argument. It makes sense. Using human logic, it is very reasonable – compelling, even. It’s just not biblical. Don’t believe me? Read John 17:20-23, where Christ prays that His followers would be unified in the same way that God the Father and the Son are unified. In other words, His prayer is that Christians will enjoy a unity that mirrors the most unified unity in all the cosmos – the trinity. Why does He pray this? “So that the world may know that you sent me and loved them even as you loved me” (v. 23). Do you think that this unity Christ prayed for was supposed to be a unity in politics? Maybe at times, depending on the circumstances. At the exclusion of unity in the gospel? No way – Jesus said twice in these 4 verses that the goal of this unity is all about the world seeing God’s love that He displayed in sending Christ (the gospel)!

So how does this relate to homosexuality? Christians, in their zeal to reform our society’s morality, have painted a false picture of Christ to the rest of the world, particularly with regard to the issue of homosexuality. Because we will quickly unify for a rally over “the traditional family,” but can’t seem to find a way to rally for the gospel, the world perceives that we are more concerned with stamping out homosexuality than we are with celebrating and sharing God’s love. Maybe they’re right. But even if they’re not, it’s still pretty clear from John 17 that we’ve failed. We aren’t showing the love of God. We are showing our love of traditional, conservative politics.

Now let me caution you from concluding that I am against Christian involvement in politics. I, for one, actually enjoy politics, and I feel very strongly that Christians ought to make their voices heard in this arena. I am not against Christians participating in (or even sponsoring) political rallies. We live in a great democratic republic, which empowers the people to elect those who represent them. With that in mind, I would argue that it is the Christian’s responsibility to be involved in politics at some level.

The problem is not that Christians are involved in politics and shouldn’t be. The problem is that we worry about saving our country from liberal legislation more than we do about saving it from sin. For every teaspoon of politics there should be 10,000 gallons of gospel. But instead we make excuses that we can’t find enough common ground with other Christians on gospel issues. So we abandon the Great Commission out of some misguided sense of superior theology. Our world is lost and dying, and we sit around making excuses why we can’t come together to bring it hope! This isn’t a “commitment to the truth” or an “unwillingness to compromise” – these phrases are euphamisms that lazy, prideful Christians use to excuse their lack of commitment to fellowship in the gospel. More accurately we should call it a “commitment to disobedience” or an “unwillingness to follow the Great Commission.” Christ expects us to find a way to be unified under the gospel, and it’s not our place to come up with a myriad of excuses why we can’t.  Churches need to think more seriously about how they can have fellowship with other churches and Christians. Instead, many churches have chosen the easy route – unity on politics, dissension on the gospel.

To make matters worse, in their zeal for politics, many conservative Christians have zeroed in on the issue of homosexuality to the exclusion of many other important political issues that directly impact the church. (When was the last time you heard Christians discuss the ramifications of churches ministering to the poor as opposed to the government creating a welfare state that supports them? For me – never. Does anyone else feel like the apostle Paul would be horrified at this?) My guess as to why this has happened is that, because homosexuality has been a losing battleground for Christians, many churches and church leaders have felt compelled to up the amp and make their anti-homosexual arguments louder, more frequent, and more passionate. The end result is that we sound obsessed, angry, hateful, and hypocritical. In other words, Christians sound unChristian when it comes to discussing homosexuality.

But there is a bigger problem here, which I alluded to earlier – Christians will never be able to reform secular society through politics. Only the regenerating work of the Holy Spirit can do any true work of moral reformation. We can’t expect non-Christians to pass laws that are based in Scripture – this is ludicrous. If our society is going to be more Christ-like, then it must be made up of more Christians. It’s as simple as that.

So I’ve got sad news for all those Christians who have rallied against homosexuality and abortion over the years – for the most part, you wasted your time. Maybe you went to the rally for fellowship and found it. Maybe you went there to better understand the issues and learned something new. Maybe you went just to get caught up in the excitement and had a good time. But if you went there to bring about any meaningful change on our nation, you failed. Our nation is more pro-gay, pro-abortion, anti-Christian than it’s ever been. Your efforts to change that went nowhere.

Rally all you want. Yell and kick and scream and preach about politics as forcefully as you can. When you wake up the next day, you’ll wake up in a country that’s run by overwhelmingly godless men who represent an overwhelmingly godless constituency. Eventually you’ll run out of moral pearls to cast at the political swine, and then what will you do? How is a Christian supposed to be “light and salt” in a society that is becoming ever increasingly hostile towards Christianity? The answer is found not in reforming society from the outside in, but from the inside out. The answer is found not in changing laws but in changing hearts. Not in winning debates but in winning souls. Not in conservatism but in Christ. Not in politics but gospel.

Yes, my friends, “Christ and Him crucified.” That, not a list of political agenda, is to be our only message. And that message is our only hope of reforming society. People will never care what Christians think about homosexuality until they care about Christ. Our only sure hope for society to be reformed morally is if it is transformed spiritually.

That is why, if as a Christian, you are truly concerned about where our nation is headed politically, you will find yourself less and less at political rallies and more and more at gospel ones. Christ wants Christians unified in politics, but He wants them unified in the love of God first.